Cakkavattisihananda Sutta: The Lion’s Roar on the Turning of the Wheel

This is the sutta that was taught in class yesterday.

It is very interesting as Buddha defined and explained how one can increase lifespan, beauty, happiness and power.

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27. ‘Monks, be an islands unto yourselves, be a refuge unto yourselves with no other refuge. Let the Dhamma be your island, let the Dhamma be your refuge, with no other refuge.

And how does a monk dwell as an island unto himself, as a refuge unto himself with no other refuge, with the Dhamma as his island, with the Dhamma as his refuge, with no other refuge?

Here, a monk abides contemplating body as body, ardent, clearly aware and mindful, having put aside hankering and fretting for the world.

Here, a monk abides contemplating feelings as feelings, ardent, clearly aware and mindful, having put aside hankering and fretting for the world.

Here, a monk abides contemplating mind as mind, ardent, clearly aware and mindful, having put aside hankering and fretting for the world.

Here, a monk abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects, ardent, clearly aware and mindful, having put aside hankering and fretting for the world.

28. ‘Keep to your own preserves, monks, to your ancestral haunts. If you do so, your life-span will increase, your beauty will increase, your happiness will increase, your wealth will increase, your power will increase. ‘And what is the length of life for a monk?

Here, a monk develops the road to power which is concentration of intention accompanied by effort of will, the road to power which is concentration of energy accompanied by effort of will, the road to power which is concentration of consciousness accompanied by effort of will, the road to power which is concentration of investigations accompanied by effort of will.

By frequently practising these four roads to power he can, if he wishes,
live for a full century, or the remaining part of a century.

This is what I call the length of life for a monk.

‘And what is the beauty for a monk?

Here a monk practises right conduct, is restrained according to the discipline, is perfect in behaviour and habits, sees danger in the slightest fault, and trains in the rules of training he has undertaken.

That is the beauty for a monk.

‘And what is happiness for a monk?

Here a monk, detached from sense desire detached from unwholesome mental states, enters and remains in the First Jhana, which is with thinking and pondering (initial application and sustained application), born of detachment, filled with delight and joy.

And with the subsiding of thinking and pondering, by gaining inner tranquillity and oneness of mind, enters and remains in the Second Jhana, which without thinking and pondering (initial application and sustained application), born of concentration, filled with delight and joy.

And with the fading away of delight, remaining imperturbable, mindful and clearly aware, he experiences in himself the joy of which the Noble Ones say: “Happy is he who dwells with equanimity and mindfulness“, he enters the Third Jhana.

And, having given up pleasure and pain, and with the disappearance of former gladness and sadness, he enters and remains in the Fourth Jhana, which is beyond pleasure and pain, and purified by equanimity and mindfulness.

That is happiness for a monk. ‘And what is wealth for a monk?

Here, a monk, with his heart filled with loving-kindness, dwells suffusing one quarter, the second, the third, the fourth. Thus he dwells suffusing the whole world, upwards, downwards, across – everywhere, always with the mind filled with loving-kindness, abundant, unbounded, without hate or ill-will.

Then, with his heart filled with compassion, dwells suffusing one quarter, the second, the third, the fourth. Thus he dwells suffusing the whole world, upwards, downwards, across – everywhere, always with the mind filled with compassion, abundant, unbounded, without hate or ill-will.

Then, with his heart filled with sympathetic joy, dwells suffusing one quarter, the second, the third, the fourth. Thus he dwells suffusing the whole world, upwards, downwards, across – everywhere, always with the mind filled with sympathetic joy, abundant, unbounded, without hate or ill-will.

Then, with his heart filled with equanimity, dwells suffusing one quarter, the second, the third, the fourth. Thus he dwells suffusing the whole world, upwards, downwards, across – everywhere, always with the mind filled with equanimity, abundant, unbounded, without hate or ill-will.

That is the wealth for a monk.

‘And what is the power for a monk?

Here, a monk, by destruction of the corruptions, enters into and abides in that corruptionless liberation of heart and liberation by wisdom which he has attained, in this very life, by his own super-knowledge and realisation.

That is the power for a monk.

‘Monks, I do not consider any power so hard to conquer as the power of Mara.
It is used by this building-up of wholesome states that this merit increases.’

Thus the Lord spoke, and the monks were delighted and rejoiced at his words.

Cakkavatti-Sihanada Sutta – The Lion’s Roar Discourse on the Turning of the Wheel Sutta Pitaka – Nigha Nikaya

Source: http://www.basicbuddhism.org/index.cfm?GPID=29

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